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Tuesday, February 28, 2017

The ABC's of MS


Alphabet Soup, Letters, Soup, Cup, Eat, Spoon

It's here! Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month! Just like last March, I pledge to post a blog every day this month in order to raise awareness of that MonSter hiding in the closet. Multiple sclerosis is often an invisible disease that affects 2.5 million people around the world, 400,000 of which are in the United States. MS attacks the protective covering (myelin) that surrounds the nerve bundles.

MS Warriors fight every day for a space in "normal".


I hope my alphabet is helpful.


                            
A is for attitude. Being a MS Warrior requires adopting and maintaining a healthy attitude. Learn to sort through the priorities. Not everyone is going to "get" it. We have to be positive.

B is for balance. We all have a plethora (love that word) of responsibilities on our plates, but we need to look for the proper balance, both mentally and physically.

C is for Common Sense. This is the Monster's nemesis. When in doubt, look inward. Contrary to popular rumors, common sense is NOT dead. It just gets over looked at times.

D is for diet. No, I am not referring to weight loss; although I firmly believe that we should strive to maintain a healthy weight. I am referring to logical and healthy choices.

E is for exercise. You can train to run that marathon if you like, but as long as you keep both your body and your mind limber you are in the battle. Stretch both your mind and body. 

F is for friends, family, and frankincense. I don't know about you, but with my diagnosis came a downsize in my social life. In fact, I am pretty much down to hanging out with my mother and conversing with my cat. But, that is okay. This weeding out process, although at times depressing, brought me back to the really important things in life. AND I learned about frankincense. Expensive essential oil, but worth the purchase effort.

G is for getting it done. Life is short and when I was diagnosed it lost even more ground. Procrastination is one of my biggest pet peeves and with multiple sclerosis it is even more of a sore spot. DO NOT PUT OFF DESIRES for another day. Get it done.

H is for hair appointments. Okay, I know what you are thinking. "How can Lisa even think this is remotely important? I am struggling to get through the day. Who cares about my hair?" You're right. I really do not care about hair appointments any more. In fact, I have fallen into the category of old woman buns. that is not the point (As I am certain you have already ascertained.) The point is, do not forget your elf image. Make that nail appointment, get that massage, order that dress, plant that flower. Tomorrow is not guaranteed.

I is for independence. I know, I know. This is at the very top of the list of things lost to MS. Suddenly we find ourselves at the mercy of other people. That may be physical, but your mind doesn't have to relinquish it's independence. The fact that you are reading this blog is an example of independence. YOU are in control of YOU. Make your own decisions about medication, therapy, and life in general. The MonSter may thing it is the driver's seat, but you still hold the key.

J is for jersey blends. If you are like me, heat is a real enemy. that is why I select my clothing carefully. Light weight, cotton, stack- able shirts; skirts when appropriate; avoiding unnecessary buttons; loose fitting and comfortable. That' s me.

K is for keeping up with Jones's. Get rid of this philosophy RIGHT NOW. You are special. You are unique. You are a Warrior. You are a Super Star. MS does not define you. 

L is for liking yourself.  Riding on the  closing thoughts of K, MS does NOT define you. we have no control over God's plan for us, but He has given us the means to do with His work what we can. Because you have MS (or cancer, or heart disease, or any other condition) doesn't mean that you belong in God's trash bin. I feel that He chose me for this challenge because He knew I could handle it.

M is for milk. No, not really. That was just cheap way to discuss vitamin D. Evidently multiple sclerosis occurs with a deficiency  of Vitamin D, which sunlight (not cows) provides. Well, guess what? Not to start a horrible medical debate, but I grew up in the sun. As a long time lifeguard, my biggest concern should really be skin cancer, not MS. I do notice a difference in my daily symptoms when I remember to consume a vitamin D supplement, so I will not question the advice of the experts.

N is for not allowing MS to win. This easy. Refer to A-M and O-Z.

O is for on-line support groups. Look for them on Face Book. I rarely contribute.  I admit it. I am a lurker. But they are there and very helpful and friendly. it is just comforting to know we are not alone.

Q is for quiet time. For reflection, for knitting, for reading, for meditation, or for prayer: This is so important. We owe it to ourselves to spend some quiet time to just breathe.

P is for politics. Yep. This is not my forte nor an active interest of mine, but when it comes to anything of importance there is always a political issue that must be  considered. Last week in West Virginia, the legislature met to discuss relevant issues regarding multiple sclerosis. I had planned to go, but ended up sitting this one out. It was timely, though, with MS Awareness Month starting today and MS Awareness Week upon us. Although I no longer take any recommended MS drug, I do take two Ampyra tablets day as a walking aid. I have a forty dollar monthly copay on a drug that would normally cost over two thousand dollars a month. Without our governmental support, prescription costs would make it impossible for us to afford the medical treatment we need. So, we need to be interested in how politics affect our MS, even if it is a nasty business.

R is for reading. The more you read, the more you know. 'Nuff said.

S is for shoes. Ahhh. Every woman's nemesis. Why are we so obsessed with shoes? I could go on a complete rhetoric of my own history with shoes, but I would probably be preaching to the choir. (See chapter 7 of my book, I Have MS. What's Your Super Power?) My affection for footwear has not lessened since diagnosis, but it has taken a turn. Where I once filled my closet with ridiculous trends and fashions, I now only have shoes of comfort and close fitting support. No more flip flops, high heels, or heavy boots. My foot drop and balance issues dictate shoe choice.

T is for time for yourself. WITHOUT FEELING GUILTY. This one is tough. My husband tells me all the time that I need to take "Lisa time". typical of the clueless, right? Does that time come before or after assuring dinner is prepared, clothes are washed, dishes are put away, groceries are purchased, bills are paid, appointments are made, son's school work is checked, hogs are fed and cows are milked? Okay, maybe that's a bit excessive, but you get the point. He is right, though. We all need time just for us. 

U is for UTI's. This is a big one for me, but if I force the water down I can usually keep things under control. As long as I know where the bathroom is, when that little pee trigger alerts me of an incoming flood, I will drink water all day. 

V is for vanity. If you need a cane or a walker, use it; and do not worry about public image. So easy for me to say, right? Not. When I was diagnosed, my students designed  beautiful walking stick that I still use to this day. it is a fashion statement and it really does get a lot of  attention. It is a conversation starter. So, if you require walking assistance, think about making your own fashion statement. I am rarely seen without mine, to the point that I have informally been dubbed "the lady with the cane". (More on this later.)

W is for water. It is not just for drinking. Water aerobics and water therapy is  popular activity in the treatment of MS. I have tried it and have been amply impressed. I just cannot afford to join a facility that provides the opportunity to exercise in this manner. (See letter P.)

X is for MRI's. Okay, maybe I stretched the alphabet game a bit, but isn't an MRI an x-ray? Duh. This may not be a whole lot of fun, but it is a necessary part of living with multiple sclerosis. Make sure that you request a viewing of the results when you have your annual or bi-annual MRI. This is one thing that has never been offered to me. If I am gong to endure the thirty or more minutes of lovely drilling tunes, I certainly deserve to see what is dug up. 

Y is for yoga. The BEST treatment I have discovered. Restorative yoga is awesome. It doesn't require a lot of physical exertion and isn't really an expensive activity. You just need a floor, a rug or yoga mat, some loose clothes, and your breath. I will offer a list of yoga resources next week.

Z is for zzzzz's. Sleep is important in anyone's life. Years ago, doctors prescribed plenty of rest for folks exhibiting symptoms of MS. Do not exercise. Remain stationary. Blah! Phooey! Sure, know when to apply the brakes on physical activity, but never stop moving. Sleep is another issue, though. I prefer the standard eight hours, but can work well with my usual six to  seven. I am an early rise, though, so my energy is usually zapped by mid afternoon. I know that and I try to schedule the less strenuous (physical and mental) portions of my day around that.

So, there you have it. My MS alphabet. What's yours?

March came in like the proverbial Lion here in Monongah, WV. Thunder, lightening, pouring rains, 70 degrees. Oh, My!

Love and Light, 
Lisa


Monday, February 27, 2017

Celebrate the month of March. My personal awareness campaign.

Image result for NMSS logos
Last March I vowed to blog for thirty days in support of MS Awareness Month. It got "hairy" at times and I didn't always have the best stuff to write, but I accomplished my goal. I realize now (and probably then) that it didn't really matter if I waxed poetic. My efforts attracted the right attention: media, social awareness, a sense of "family" among the MS Warriors who read my blog.

It is time to do it again. 

On Wednesday, March 1, I will begin my 2017 thirty day awareness campaign. Make sure you "tune" in.

See you here!
Lisa

Friday, February 24, 2017

Thirty Days of MS Awareness Coming Your Way. Ideas welcome.

Awareness – Together We Are Stronger


Last march I committed to posting a blog post every day in March to raise awareness of MS. Although I have yet to see much information in the media about this for 2017, I am taking it upon myself to repeat my commitment.

Starting Wednesday, March 1, I will be posting a blog every day in the on the of March. That's  lot of planning and posting, friends, but it is my mission. Since March is my birth month and the green month of St. Patrick's Day, this ids a gift to my self.

I am looking for ideas for my daily post. Although this blog was originally created to share my journey with the MonSter, I have been known to include a variety of topics...I mean, life isn't ALL about MS, right? 

So far, I plan to discuss books and share some of my reviews. If you follow me at all you know of my passion for the written word. But, I am not the authority on books, so I welcome any suggestions. In fact, if anyone is interested in forming an on-line book club right here on Lisa's Page, I am ALL FOR IT!

I will also be following my MS in relationship to the changing season. Spring always presents issues of allergies, over the counter remedies, and good ol' West Virginia sinus issues as our bodies acclimate to what is supposed to be Earth's rebirth into warmer temps. How does this affect your MS?

Of course, I will be talking about my knitting...or lack there of. Yesterday I was right on track with my latest project. (I am knitting  socks on straight needles...hmmm.) So excited to count the correct about of stitches on my needle. So thrilled to be doing something different. Anxious to share my first sock with bestie Jodi. And then...it happened...I counted again. I am still looking for those two lost stitches. I swear my cat stole them right out from under me. She's like that.

And, then there is the issue of camping. I LOVE to camp in Bemis, WV, and the time is drawing near when my family will be yearning for those mountain breakfasts, camp fires, and fresh stream fishing. Ahh...Are we there yet? So, I want to hear about your little peace of Earthly paradise because Bemis is definitely mine.

I also like to do a bit of research, and am more than willing to put my librarian skills to work for you. Give me your MS questions and I will enthusiastically put my undergrad degree to work.

Wow! That's a lot of writing to do. I had better get busy. So...

There will be no post on Monday. Gearing up for the big reveal on Wednesday.

Have a blessed weekend and I will see you then.

Love and Light,
Lisa

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Heaven received a special Warrior this week.

No, no, no, no, no!!!!
I open this morning's newspaper and see it: the obituary of a girl younger than I. Dead after a long battle with multiple sclerosis. 

All of medical science preaches that mutiple sclerosis does not kill us. Right? We may become disabled because of complications that are directly a result of MS, but our disease is not a killer.

But, there is is...Barbara dead at 55.

I realize with an increasing horror that I knew her. She was the bubbly greeter at the area MS Self-Help/Support group meetings that my mother I attend when I was initially diagnosed. Barbara, obviously younger than I, a mother of small children at the time, was on fire with enthusiasm. I really do not believe she was denial; she simply wanted to know more and she needed to share with others newly diagnosed. But, Barbara had had time to partially accept her destiny and wanted t present a positive front. 

As a newborn MS Warrior, her urgent need to reassure and envelope me into the fold was over whelming to the point that I knew I unintentionally pushed her away. She scared me.

She also intrigued me. How could a person with this horrible disease be so upbeat? Why did she want me to be upbeat as well? Couldn't she see that I was frightened beyond words? No, I didn't want to get together for coffee, but thanks for asking. Thank you, but I really do not think I can do a play date with our children (mine was only six months old!) any time soon. (I couldn't even hold my son without fear of dropping him.)

As I attempted to emulate Barbara's welcoming spirit, I silently screamed for her to shut up, go away, leave me alone. At that time I did not understand her cries of and for friendship. She needed me as much, if not  more, than I needed her.

Barbara was the youngest member of this odd assortment of Warriors. Chronologically she had difficulty relating to Tina in the wheelchair, Roger with his double-fisted canes, and blind Tom in the corner. She was still walking unassisted and exuberant in her quest to remain whole for her babies. She had taken it upon herself to be the MS welcome wagon for the less mobile facilitator of the group. Because she needed to be needed. She needed to be useful. Barbara needed to be whole again.

I get it now. 

That very individual whose spirit initially frighten me away from that group was setting the stage for my own attitude toward this ridiculous disease. In my heart I know that was right and I was so, so very ungrateful at the time. I really believe that Barbara knew that and she forgave me. 

Because, she got it, too. And it was her plan to live life to the very fullest, head on with a smile and a welcome. I wish I could let Barbara's family know that she touched me and I truly believe that the fear she ignited in me was the best medicine that any physician could prescribe.

I do not know the particulars of Barbara's life or what she has dealt with in the fifteen years since our first and only meeting. And I really want to believe that she did not die of  MS, but rather because of symptoms of it. But, we are also told that we cannot die of a broken heart. And I do not believe that.

So there.

Rest in peace, Barbara. Heaven received a special 
warrior this week.



Monday, February 20, 2017

Ouch! So this is pain of MS?


Comic text sound effects pop art vector style. Sound bubble speech word cartoon expression sounds illustration. Lettering Ouch discomfort. Comics book background template.
Since my diagnosis in 2001, I have read repeatedly about the physical pain associated with multiple sclerosis. Call it naivete, call it stupidity, call if just could fortune, but I never knew what that meant. The only physical pain I could identity with was the result of a fall. My parts just didn't hurt otherwise. 

I guess it took sixteen years, or maybe it is my advanced age, but the physical pain has finally caught up. For several weeks I have suffered off and on from a weird burning sensation of the "woman" parts. No, it is not an infection, and no, I so not have any sort of communicable disease. Sure, it could have something to do with post menopause or the fact that my body recognizes my true age even if my mind does not. It is really weird. The best way for me to find relief is to not wear undergarments or tight pants. It (the discomfort) hangs around for a few days, and then, just as quickly, is gone. I really do believe that it due to highly sensitive nerve endings. And that is a result of MS, right?

For about as long as this very intimate ailment has existed, my legs have complained daily and are fraught with sever cramping and debilitating spasticity (Did you know that this word is not recognized by spellcheck or in the dictionary? Why do I find this so appropriate for this undefinable disease that I have?). My toes curl up and my feet ache. It is horrible, besides being just downright inconvenient. Granted, I do not exercise as I probably should, but I try to stretch and do a bit of yoga every day to relieve signs of physical stress. It just doesn't seem to be enough.

And I am tired. Really tired. I just do not want to do much of anything. My daily multivitamin with an extra boost of iron helps, but not always. I hate it when my favorite time of day is bed time. And that is what it has become. I am great in the morning, super great; full of vim and vigor. After my son leaves for school, I fire up my computer to accomplish a full day's amount of work. I review books, answer e-mail, do some writing, and sometimes even fit in a FB game or two (That is dangerous diversion, though.) I clean before 9AM, pay bills, make lists, and basically plan the rest of the day. By lunch time,I have accomplished more than more people in a day. And I take my time about it, so do not assume I wear myself out. It is just that my energy level is on fire when the day is just awaking. But, when I am finished, I am literally d-o-n-e: physically, emotionally, and mentally.
[Okay, so this really doesn't sound like I am that tired at all, does it?
The crash comes later. And when it occurs, all I want to to do is be left alone. I could be ready for bed by 9PM and would seriously do just that if not for the many responsibilities of being a parent and a wife.]

Other than an attempt at yoga and stretching, my fight against the pain has been the beautiful high dose of ibuprofen to which I succumb all too frequently of late. I do not like my relationship with this pain pill; but, when essential oils, exercise, and herbal tea does not work, I have no other recourse.

What do you do to combat this annoying pain and fatigue? I cannot afford the expense of a monthly massage (although that is a lovely way to spend money), so that is out. So, do not suggest what I know to be a sincerely wonderful addition to the anecdote list.

What do you do?

I am anxious to hear from you on this fine pre-season spring day in West Virginia.

Love and Light,
Lisa

Friday, February 17, 2017

The Old Drive-In

The Old Drive-In by [Reiss, Howard]AWESOME BOOK!!!

Today I am not writing about MS. Today I am handing you a gift.

I have reviewed books for Readers Favorite for years, just for fun; since my retirement this has become more serious than a past-time. I actually earn a few bucks for doing what I love most: READING and WRITING. It is the perfect job for me.

Yesterday I read a novel that I cannot get out of my mind. Never having heard of the author before, my curiosity turned to infatuation. Howard Reiss is my new favorite author. Of course, I tend to gush bout the last book I read until another good one comes along; but I am totally serious. Reiss is an awesome story teller and I cannot wait to get my hands on his other work.




Reviewed by Lisa A. McCombs for Readers Favorite
Mitch and Sandi had the perfect life: gorgeous city apartment, two pretty children, a lucrative income, and the world by the tail. And then…Mitch’s law firm went belly up…and his father died. As Mitch reflects on his life, he realizes that neither of these disasters really matter. He returns to his childhood home in order to complete the process of closing that door forever when he is hit with a solid round of reality. With the unsolicited help of a hitch hiker named Sam and his mother’s best and Merri, his mother’s best and only friend, Mitch comes to terms with the facts that he really doesn’t like practicing law, his hated father might have had sincere feelings for him, and his first love was truly his one and only. Mitch sorts through the clutter of his childhood in an attempt to exorcise the past, while discovering his true destiny.

Howard Reiss unearths a genuinely beautiful story in The Old Drive-In. A truly nostalgic reflection on what could have/should have been that we all question some time in life. Reiss’s dialogue flows with sincere reality making his characters very relatable. Many times while reading I had to look over my shoulder to assure myself that they were not in the room with me. The underlying themes of apparent in The Old Drive-In range from adult coming of age and self-discovery to a truly timeless romance. This reviewer plans to adorn her bookshelves with other wonderful stories by Howard Reiss.  I wish I could give Mr. Reiss more than five stars!

Howard R Reiss

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

What NOT to say to a person with MS


What it's like to have a chronic illness:


It has happened to you. You know it. Maybe you are guilty of the same thing; empathizing with someone else's pain.

It's a common reaction and one that all humans program as a response to another's complaint.

That doesn't make it any better, though.

Maybe it is because this morning I am plagued with chills, have a killer ear ache, and just do not feel well, my patience with folks who insist on attempting to be in my shoes is at a low. My immediate ailments are NOT due to MS, but (unfortunately) the multiple sclerosis tends to magnify any physical (or mental/emotional) interruption in daily living; so, YES, I probably feel worse than the normal person. Interestingly enough, though, with my current physical state, my walking gait is rather impressive today. Funny how the body compensates.

So, I plan to blunder through my day with as much bravado as I can muster. Today is bowling day and my day with Mom. So, I must overcome, breathe the other way, and push through this thing. That ids what we Warriors do, right? Today I will sucker punch MS and try to bowl above my average. For most people that wouldn't be too difficult since my average is very low. Like 30's? I did have a 75 game last week (Don't know how that happened.), so there is hope.

So, to those folks who doubt that I am sick, or that I do not get enough exercise, or that you know how I feel, I am dragging my "don't look sick" body into today. And I will enjoy it.

If you don't commiserate with me, I will return the favor.

Cheers,
Lisa




https://multiplesclerosis.net/infographic/things-not-to-say-to-ms-people/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=promoted&utm_campaign=MS

  • You don’t look sick
  • You shouldn’t drink diet coke
  • OMG this diet cures MS
  • OMG this vitamin will leave you symptom free
  • Aren’t you gluten free? … You should be
  • Aren’t you too healthy looking to have MS
  • Try this herb; it helped my cousin’s uncles’ sister’s friend who has MS
  • Well aren’t you taking your meds?? (Yes….) Then why is your MS bothering you still?
  • Are you contagious?
  • You shouldn’t eat meat…
  • What did you do to get MS?
  • How DID you get that? You must’ve had mono
  • If the heat bothers you, don’t be in it… or move…
  • I heard a vaccine caused it
  • Can’t you just walk slower?
  • Why are you dragging one of your feet?
  • Why are you always so tired? It can’t be that bad…
  • Well if you’re in remission, why are you on meds?
  • If pregnancy makes it better, why don’t you just keep having more kids!
  • That celebrity with MS seems just fine, why aren’t you?
  • Do you take enough vitamins?
    Are you sure it’s MS…? How can doctors be so sure?
  • Stop using MS as an excuse… you can’t feel that way ALL the time.
  • Maybe you just need to try a little harder.
  • Why don’t you try a different medication, that doesn’t cause so many side effects?
  • You seemed fine the other day…
  • You slept ALL night, how can you be so tired?
  • (This is for the younger MS’ers) WOW… you take more medicine than my grandma…
  • MS… isn’t that the muscle illness? (No. That’s MD = Muscular Dystrophy)
  • You daydream a lot in the middle of a conversation, that’s rude! (No… it’s cognitive issues)
  • Why do you keep forgetting things?
  • Oh TRUST me… I know exactly how you feel!
  • Oh, you should just exercise more…
  • It really can’t be that bad…
Oh… and when they compare how they feel or have felt in the past, with your symptoms… like it’s the EXACT same feeling…


More good reading:

Monday, February 13, 2017

Do you push yourself?

Related image

There is no doubt about it. Entertaining the MonSter is hard work. We MS Warriors are always on call. There is no room for a "time out".

Yet, it is emotionally and physically impossible to be "on call" 24/7. Or, is it?

The first thing we have to do is get our head in the game. Last week I fully realized the physical pain associated with MS as I fought with my legs to move and my hands to grasp. I succumbed to tears when no one was looking. I allowed myself to consume massive amounts of junk food as a ridiculous placebo to my pain. I found myself snapping at my son and my husband about trivial things, and basically just didn't care about their feelings. I mean, couldn't they see I was in pain? Weren't they aware of my condition? Why did they want my compassion about their own snuffly nose and  weather related aches and pains? How could they forget that I dealt with much worse on a daily basis?

And then, it dawned on me that my personal reaction to life was affecting my family life. 

And...it was basically my own fault.

My MS was not really their baggage.

I wasn't pushing myself, I wasn't being the warrior I profess to be.

Multiple sclerosis is hard work. In order to properly function, we must be ever mindful of that...every...single...day.

When I am doing that, I go to the floor for gentle/restorative yoga as soon as my son is off to school in the morning. The positive effects are nearly instantaneous. The problem? I often get lazy even under the judgmental eyes of my yoga Nazi feline pal. My cat knows me better than I know myself. I really believe she holds me accountable for how I will feel the rest of the day.

Which brings me to a valuable point: accountability. Some of us need that challenge to keep us honest, and if that works for you, go with it; even if it is a cat to whom you answer. 

So, get off your duff and move. You want to bet this thing? Non one is going to hand you the magic answer. Neuros can give advice; general practitioners can offer their two cents; friends can commiserate...but, the end result is how we meet this first hand.

I learned a long time ago that basically I AM ON MY OWN. And most of the Warriors I have met know that, too. We can share experiences and personal tips, but the end result is that we are oiur own physician.

This sounds rather depressing, but it is all in our perspective. And it is all in how we treat ourselves. Know your boundaries but never stop pushing yourself.

This past weekend was rather busy for me and after a local book signing on Saturday I just didn't think I could continue with my busy agenda for the rest of weekend. A two hour drive Sunday morning with the return drive in the afternoon for another book event? Was it worth it? did I really need to put myself through that?

I could cancel. I could be that deadbeat undependable person. Or I could mentally slap myself around a bit, get a good night's sleep, realize that my family would survive a few hours without me and get out there to do what I have always dreamed of doing. Since a little girl, I have always wanted to be a writer. Now I am. One of the responsibilities of a writer is to promote your work. That takes energy. That takes a mental, emotional and physical push.

So, I pushed myself and I had a great day. I sold a few books, but even more importantly, I connected with other MS Warriors. I made the effort and I had wonderful conversation with other folks living with the MonSter. 

I pushed myself. And I am glad.

Push your self today, this week, this month.
Lisa


GOOD STUFF:

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

You might be contagious.


Image result for pictures of sneezing and coughing

Struggling with a writing topic this morning, I stumbled across this little video by Pastor Phil Waldrep that instantly caught my attention. The message is direct. It is simple. It is so true.

Often times when announcing my relationship with the MonSter, the concern for contagion is posed. No, one cannot contract multiple sclerosis by contact with a Warrior. Multiple Sclerosis is not a contagious disease. People do not get MS; they have MS. This is a preconceived condition that has noting to do with washing your hands or covering your mouth when coughing. MS does not spread like the flu. MS just is.

But our attitude does spread, affecting everyone with whom we come in contact. So, in answer to that question of contamination:
"No, MS is not contagious; but attitude about it is.

Take a peek at Waldrep's message and concentrate on being contagious.


http://philwaldrep.us2.list-manage.com/track/click?u=664b015e5b973cd2b7fe5b8f2&id=71b7a13e5b&e=ae605e398c

Lisa