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X is for MRI MS Awareness Month #WeAreStrongerThanMS

Image result for image of th eletter Xis for MRI's. Okay, maybe I stretched the alphabet game a bit, but isn't an MRI an x-ray? 

Duh. This may not be a whole lot of fun, but it is a necessary part of living with multiple sclerosis. 

For those of salivating with the need to appear more in-the-know  when referring to this procedure, MRI  is a magnetic resonance imaging scan that is a highly sensitive, yet non-invasive,  method of viewing internal damage to the body. es, it is an x-ray.
Image result for mri machine



Of course, this image is deceiving in it's sense of peaceful environment. There is no soft relaxing music canned in, there are no soothing candles lighting the dark corner of the room, and there is not a yogi standing by to send you positive waves of energy.


This is basically a cold, antiseptic (hopefully) hospital space of blue dye injections and jack hammer distraction.

You know all about it. If not, let me give a personal tour.

MRI's have come  along way over the years. Modern MRI vessels often offer side windows which help (supposedly) with any claustrophobic feeling experienced while in the "tube". I really do prefer this, but sometimes that outside light can interfere with the photographic process.

Even though, while having an MRI, one has the sensation of being completely encased, it is really only your head that is  being held captive. I mean really, take a good look at the image at the top of this page. You are instructed to lie on that bed and that foam wedge  is placed under the knees to more carefully align the body; ear plugs or head phones are inserted and a warm blanket covers you snugly; there is a little be-sting sensation as the intravenous appliances are connected; and  the technician stabilizes the head and neck area with soft cushions. If you anticipate any claustrophobic issues, you will offered a mild sedative. I cannot honestly address this because I have never agreed to said sedative. Not because of any religious or super hero beliefs. I am just a supreme glutton for strange and unusual punishments. The birth of my child would have a natural procedure if it had been up to me. (That's another story for another day.)

The entire procedure can take anywhere from a few minutes to nearly an hour. My average MRI has always run about 45 minutes once the actual imaging action begins. 

My first MRI was terrifying, but these x-rays have become more of a nuisance than an event to fear. Initially I was prescribed a bi-annually MRI in order to track the effects of the pharms  in relationship to my existing brain lesions.  That is usually down-sized to once  year. IN fact, I haven'tr had an MRI in several years, so I really do not know what is going on up there in cerebellum land.

Which brings me to a very important issue.

Make sure that you request a viewing of the results when you have your annual or bi-annual MRI. This is one thing that has never been offered to me. I have been told what the images report, but I have never actually seen the pictures. If I am gong to endure the thirty or more minutes of lovely drilling tunes, I certainly deserve to see what is dug up. 

The following links can tell you more about MS and MRI's. 

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/Symptoms-Diagnosis/Diagnosing-Tools/MRI

https://shift.ms/symptoms?
h42H9YUBEiQAmki5OhdyUe4N-FERqqKtroOjlFRiFhWJ3UnPEfvMpipefcUaAk4n8P8HAQ

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/342254-overview


Don't forget to tell our friends about MS Awareness Month. There are only a few days left to enter the challenge to win a copy of I Have MS. What's Your Super ? by following this blog. I have so appreciated an enjoyed meeting a few new sisters this month and truly hope we can continue our newfound kinship.

Since my MS alphabet is drawing to a close just days short of the end of the month, there are going to be several free days in my thirty days of posting. If there is anything you want to talk about, let me know. I will do the research or just sit back and let you talk to us.

Love and Light,
Lisa
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