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Tuesday, July 16, 2013

You don't have to be famous to have MS.

After a relatively awful week of MS related symptoms (No, I did not pee myself, but I came close a couple of times:), I became curious about the infamy of the disease. Such celebrities as Donna Fargo, singer Chrissy Amphlett and American football player Dan Carnevale are victims of MS, but there is not much, or any, media hype about this; which makes me glad that celebrities are not receiving "special treatment", but also saddens me that BIG NAMES are not known for supporting the cure. That is not to say that they are not advocating treatment; but, face it, it takes persons in high place to get the rest of us recognized.

French neurologist named Jean Martin Charcot was the first person that actually recognized Multiple Sclerosis as a disease in the year of 1868. From what  I have read about MS, victims of this disease were treated as "freaks" and were even institutionalized as of 1950. Well, I do not see us as "freaks" and have never  considered joining the circus to earn my fare in a cage.  I wonder how Jean Martin Charcot encountered this condition. The research it must have taken to decide that certain symptoms must be a result of this neurological situation had to be astounding.

The symptoms are SO varied. 

I suffer from:
tingly fingers
 a dropped foot
chronic fatigue
intolerance to heatcor
occasional slurred speech
incontinence
head and hand tremors
unreliable cognitive ability
occasional depression
difficulty in concentration

...and that's just to name a few.

I have an MS friend who is confined to a wheel chair and have been acquaintances with two people who actually died as a result of the complications of MS. 

I no longer self-inject, but used Beta Seron for ten years. I cannot say whether or not this helped me or not, since most MS treatments are scientific experiments and who can say what life would be without them. I think I feel better without my Beta Seron, but I can't be certain of the validity of that statement. I do know that I no longer am plagued with the corresponding bruises and interruptions in my day in order to perform that task; I think I have more energy now that I have stopped taking the drug, but I know that ten years makes us more tired any way. 

So, what is my conclusion? I don't really know.
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