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The Prodigy by A.L. Campbell


Reviewed by Lisa McCombs for Readers Favorite
Miles never dreamed of being anything other than the obedient, well-mannered boy his mother expected him to be. Academically superior, his grades made enough of a hero of him, but when his athletic skills became obvious in high school, he was the boy who had it all. When he agreed to try his hand at playing football, it was only as a favor to the man who had become a father-figure to him. He was able to keep his extracurricular activity secret from his mother until his fame on the field gained notoriety. Promising never to keep such information from his mother again, Miles continued to excel in sports until his talent earned him full college scholarships and national attention. Everyone profited from his fame, but was it enough to keep him honest?
A.L. Campbell portrays the harsh reality of college sports in the novel The Prodigy. Sports fans are often not privy to the politics behind the making of a sports hero. It is a sad business that overlooks the true purpose of a college education in favor of the monetary rewards of building a successful sports program, but it is unfortunately the truth of today’s society thought process. The story of Miles Star is a heartwarming portrayal of one successful young man and the effects of his success on friends and family members. His struggle to keep a healthy perspective on life defines the moral dilemma of a large population America’s youth. When did fun get taken out of “playing”?
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