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Reviewed by Lisa McCombs for Readers Favorite
Reckless Perfection is a colorful portrayal of ethnic diversity in America’s public school system. High school co-eds Mercedez, Julia, Angela, and Amanda are examples of the hidden life of today’s youth. Physical abuse, relationship angst, gossip, bullying…these are the biggest problems described in this raw  depiction of urban life and the battle of the social placement in society. Friends betray friends and family situations are revealed when these girls dared to date outside of their social status. When bad boy Robbie enters the picture, rumors begin to circulate concerning his mysterious past and his sexual prowess with the girls of Roctown High. Additional problems erupt when Mercedez attacks her pregnant stepmother and endangers the life of her unborn sister. Twins Julio and Julia attempt to sooth troubled waters of the parents’ marriage. Angela struggles to correct her checkered past and make amends with those she hurt. Amanda just wants to find true love.
                Has embraced the cultural atmosphere with this tumultuous account of the private lives of urban teenagers, where adult accountability and guidance is disappointingly low. Reckless Perfection is a wonderful example of children raising children; children who are forced to grow up too quickly. The use of Spanish terminology and neighborhood colloquialisms adds the cultural realism that places this story in a genre all its own. I believe this story would be better received on the West Coast where there is a need for diverse young adult literature.
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