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Reviewed by Lisa McCombs for Readers Favorite
Bobby, an author by trade faces his greatest writing challenge to date as he struggles to pull his characters out of a dangerous and suspenseful situation. Nothing out of the ordinary for your every day author. Except Bobby is anything but ordinary. Bobby is in a coma. As he writes the scintillating lines of his latest novel, the world revolves around him, unaware of his what is happening in these seemingly vegetative individual. Where Bobby's medical condition has become a hopeless waiting game for his friends and family, he produces a fictional tale of intrigue that oddly mirrors his current life. The exception to the otherwise pessimistic perspective of his chances of survival is his four year old niece, Chloe, plans her days around Uncle Bobby's return to the living because of her invention of a magical magnet that will operate on his damaged brain. While the rest of the family fashion their daily schedules around hospital visits that can only lead to their last look at Bobby, they are unaware that he he miraculously hears their words and sees their actions. He grows fond of his caregivers and silently offers advice and concern for all those around him.
I found myself praying for Bobby's survival, regardless of the grim reality of his diagnosis. Caught in a fascination with the story he weaves as a writer and the lives of those who care about him, I tended to forget about the perilous condition of the main character until the surprising ending forced me to re-read the last pages   to confirm that his story had come to an end. The Wonder of Ordinary Magic left me haunted by these characters for days after I finished reading.
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