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Press Release for Abby

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NOVEL ENCOURAGES TEENS TO BE THEMSELVES TO BE HAPPY

Meeting it Head on with a Positive Attitude


Monongah, West Virginia - June 16,2011 - Many teenagers get thrown unprepared into adult situations and left to struggle with them on their own. In the young adult fiction novel Abby, author Lisa McCombs introduces us to Abigail Van Buren Masterson, a seventh grader who experiences many changes in her life when her mother is diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. By journaling to her namesake (Dear Abby), Abigail details issues of living with the repercussions of her mother's disease while struggling to "fit in" as the new kid in her fifth school in seven years. This story is a reflection of the most pivotal time in life. Rather than succumbing to depression and anger as many young adults do, Abigail meets these challenges head on in an attempt to view the world with a positive perspective. McCombs hopes that this novel will inspire young women to take a positive approach to their adolescent years.
     Abby has been described as "refreshing", "informative, yet entertaining", and "easy and believable read" that speaks to our youth and reinforces the fact that being a teenager is not a disease and that they are not alone on their journey.

     About the Author: Lisa McCombs has taught reading and English in West Virginia for 29 years and is passionate about adolescent literature. Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2001 after the birth of her son, Lisa is an advocate of MS research. As a teacher, Lisa encourages her students to use a personal journal as therapy for dealing with the adventures of growing up.

For interviews Contact:
Lisa A. McCombs
(304)534-3439
hummingbirdo2000@yahoo.com
www.Lisa-McCombs@blogspot.com
Books are available at www.friesenpress.com/bookstore, www.amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, and at Kerri's Korner in East Fairmont, WV.

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